what is my ip address March of Tigers

March of Tigers


One person just doing their best to get by, and help others along the way.

Stuff you should know: Here for QTPOC Initiatives, Spotlights, Coverage, and Support. I'm 18, I'm black(white-passing) and I'm genderesscent. (Online my pronouns are ze/zir/zerm) Have a good one!

The Intersecting Oppressions of Marginalized Groups Miranda rights  Who I Am Here For  

experimentaltimeorder:

afrofuturistaffair:

Books on Science Fiction and Black Speculative Critical Analysis

1. The Black Imagination: Science Fiction, Futurism and the Speculative (Black Studies and Critical Thinking) (2011) by Sandra Jackson - This critical collection covers a broad spectrum of works, both literary and cinematic, and issues from writers, directors, and artists who claim the science fiction, speculative fiction, and Afro-futurist genres.

2. Black Space: Imagining Race in Science Fiction Film (2008) by Adilifu Nama - The first book-length study of African American representation in science fiction film, Black Space demonstrates that SF cinema has become an important field of racial analysis, a site where definitions of race can be contested and post-civil rights race relations (re)imagined.

3. Race in American Science Fiction (2011) by Isiah Lavender III - Race in American Science Fiction offers a systematic classification of ways that race appears and how it is silenced in science fiction, while developing a critical vocabulary designed to focus attention on often-overlooked racial implications. These focused readings of science fiction contextualize race within the genre’s better-known master narratives and agendas.

4. Horror Noire: Blacks in American Horror Films from 1890s to Present (2011) by Robin Means Coleman - Horror Noire presents a unique social history of blacks in America through changing images in horror films. Throughout the text, the reader is encouraged to unpack the genre’s racialized imagery, as well as the narratives that make up popular culture’s commentary on race. Offering a comprehensive chronological survey of the genre, this book addresses a full range of black horror films, including mainstream Hollywood fare, as well as art-house films, Blaxploitation films, direct-to-DVD films, and the emerging U.S./hip-hop culture-inspired Nigerian “Nollywood” Black horror films.

So basically Im bout to spend all the money on the books Ive sold so far, on these books. Needs alla this.

Source: afrofuturistaffair

untouchmyhair:

:( rest in peace honey.
Link to the fundraiser: https://www.giveforward.com/fundraiser/rmd4/in-memory-of-domineque-banks/updates/69537

untouchmyhair:

:( rest in peace honey.

Link to the fundraiser: https://www.giveforward.com/fundraiser/rmd4/in-memory-of-domineque-banks/updates/69537

Source: untouchmyhair

Exposing A TumblrInAction Mod:

jethroq:

tumblunni:

feministrocker:

If i-dont-need-feminism reblogs something from you, it’s likely a sign that you’re featured on Tumblr In Action. She’s a moderator of that subreddit, and her name there is Miss_anthropyy.

Just for anyone who doesn’t know why this is bad: Tumblr In Action exists to make fun of anyone on Tumblr who believes in equality, basically.

I don’t like this culture of singling out random individuals and laughing at them behind their backs in the first place, but its even more sickening that they’re shaming people for (according to them) being too passionate about stopping racism, not worrying about “real problems”, or for saying the patriarchy exists when REALLY its apparantly women who’re oppressing men by not paying for dates, etc etc…

Worth also noting, that despite the subreddit’s official policy of showcasing blog entries and discouraging interaction, it’s also very common taht once a post is featured on TIA, anonymous hate, as well as reblogs by virulent anti-SJ, as well as openly bigoted blogs tend to skyrocket.

Tagged: important infopro-ij

Source: feministrocker

Nearly 12,000 Petition Signatures To Be Delivered at 2 p.m. to County Attorney Bill Montgomery! →

justiceforshanesha:

On Tuesday April 15, 2014 at 2 p.m. local Arizonians will deliver a petition signed by nearly 12,000 people from across the U.S. asking that County Attorney Bill Montgomery drop the charges against Shanesha Taylor.

People across the country ask that Maricopa County &…

Source: justiceforshanesha

mushroomsugar:

Trans blogger: Trans people are better than cis people.

Cis blogger: Trans All people are better than cis people. Fixed.

Cis blogger: wait

Source: mushroomsugar

Linda Harvey Blames LGBT Youth Homelessness on LGBT Youth →

invisiblelad:

projectqueer:

“‘Kids are kicked out of their homes just for being who they are,’ is how the saying goes, well let me offer another possibility that I’ve heard far too often: a parent learns that a son or daughter is claiming to be gay but an underage child still lives at home, so the now-heartbroken parent puts new restrictions on some of the activities like for instance, the teen is no longer going to be having sleepovers with that same-sex friend, or if the friend is a college student or has an apartment, visits over there will not be permitted.

"What does the teen do? It may become a fight where the teen storms out by choice and leaves voluntarily because the homosexual relationship is more important than that of his or her parents. And when that all-important relationship ends, the teen is too stubborn or already too-involved in alcohol or drugs or the premature independence of the homosexual life and he or she would rather drift than return home. It’s not always the case of course but personal decisions are at the heart of these issues."

— Hate group leader Linda Harvey, claiming on her radio show last week that LGBT youth homelessness is actually the fault of LGBT youth.

How to twist logic to defend hostility and horrible living conditions of lgbtq teenagers. Linda Harvey is pretty well documented in her rabid and calloused disregard for gay people, but this sort of commentary not only stands as evidence of her general animus, but her complete lack of empathy and reason on the topic she seems so entirely focused on. 

Source: projectqueer

internleland:

harryistrash:

a 14 year old indian kid figured out that if the federal government changed their official font from times new roman to garamond they could save $234 million a year (source)

his name is Suvir Mirchandani

omitting identity from these things is how poc contributions and achievements end up getting erased altogether

his name is Suvir Mirchandani

Source: harryistrash

This Is What America's First Muslim Fraternity Looks Like →

thisismab:

heyyyy brothas

Source: thisismab

africandiasporaphd:

Doctoring Freedom: The Politics of African American Medical Care in Slavery and Emancipation by Gretchen Long

For enslaved and newly freed African Americans, attaining freedom and citizenship without health for themselves and their families would have been an empty victory. Even before emancipation, African Americans recognized that control of their bodies was a critical battleground in their struggle for autonomy, and they devised strategies to retain at least some of that control. In Doctoring Freedom, Gretchen Long tells the stories of African Americans who fought for access to both medical care and medical education, showing the important relationship between medical practice and political identity.
Working closely with antebellum medical journals, planters’ diaries, agricultural publications, letters from wounded African American soldiers, WPA narratives, and military and Freedmen’s Bureau reports, Long traces African Americans’ political acts to secure medical care: their organizing mutual-aid societies, their petitions to the federal government, and, as a last resort, their founding of their own medical schools, hospitals, and professional organizations. She also illuminates work of the earliest generation of black physicians, whose adult lives spanned both slavery and freedom. For African Americans, Long argues, claiming rights as both patients and practitioners was a political and highly charged act in both slavery and emancipation.

africandiasporaphd:

Doctoring Freedom: The Politics of African American Medical Care in Slavery and Emancipation by Gretchen Long

For enslaved and newly freed African Americans, attaining freedom and citizenship without health for themselves and their families would have been an empty victory. Even before emancipation, African Americans recognized that control of their bodies was a critical battleground in their struggle for autonomy, and they devised strategies to retain at least some of that control. In Doctoring Freedom, Gretchen Long tells the stories of African Americans who fought for access to both medical care and medical education, showing the important relationship between medical practice and political identity.

Working closely with antebellum medical journals, planters’ diaries, agricultural publications, letters from wounded African American soldiers, WPA narratives, and military and Freedmen’s Bureau reports, Long traces African Americans’ political acts to secure medical care: their organizing mutual-aid societies, their petitions to the federal government, and, as a last resort, their founding of their own medical schools, hospitals, and professional organizations. She also illuminates work of the earliest generation of black physicians, whose adult lives spanned both slavery and freedom. For African Americans, Long argues, claiming rights as both patients and practitioners was a political and highly charged act in both slavery and emancipation.

Source: uncpress.unc.edu

Hey Mutals! Since I’m completing scholarships and I know other people are, if you ever need a reccomendation letter, LET ME KNOW!!! :D

Thanks reverseracism!!!

<3